Role of Delta Opioid Receptors in Bone Cancer

Bone cancer pain is one of the more common and challenging symptoms associated with advanced cancer. Current treatments for bone cancer pain are limited due to lack of efficacy, side effects and/or difficulty in administration. Previous work in the Bilsky laboratory provides a rationale for developing analgesics (pain relievers) that target the delta opioid receptor. The research funded by the Maine Cancer Foundation will investigate the activity and side-effect profile of novel drugs that activate this receptor in a mouse model of bone cancer, with the ultimate goal of having better analgesics for bone cancer patients (as well as other cancer-related pain conditions).

Organization: 
University of New England
Researcher: 
Edward Bilsky
Grant Amount Given: 
$81,995
Year Issued: 
2008
Period: 
Annual
Grant Category: 
Research
Types of Cancer: 
Bone
Grant Duration: 
1 Year Pilot Grant

Maine Cancer Foundation Grants to this Organization:

Year Program Amount Category Organization
2017 Methods and Diagnostics for Cancer Detection and Treatment Monitoring $375,000 Screening University of New England
2013 The Role of the Kappa Opioid Receptor in Regulating Cancer Proliferation in Vitro and In Vivo $50,000 Research University of New England
2013 Improving the Treament of Cancer Related Pain $22,540 Education University of New England
2012 Feasibility of Using SEER-Medicare Data to Assess the Influence of ESA Policy Changes on Outcomes $55,936 Research University of New England
2012 The Role of IL-6 Signaling in Cancer-induced Bone Pain $139,633 Research University of New England
2011 Non-Psychotropic Cannabinoid2 Receptor Agonists Inhibit Breast Cancer Proliferation $105,197 Research University of New England
2008 Role of Delta Opioid Receptors in Bone Cancer $81,995 Research University of New England
2002 Occupational Therapy Education $5,000 Education University of New England
2001 The Impact of Chemotherapy on Memory in Women with Breast Cancer $5,074 Research University of New England